Tag Archives: transportation

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Different modes of transit in Greater Toronto – removing political spin and disinformation


Photo By Myke Waddy, Sept 5th 2006. Health Sci...

Photo By Myke Waddy, Sept 5th 2006. Health Sciences LRT Station, Edmonton, Alberta. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Explaining different modes of transit in the G.T.A; removing political spin and disinformation

Found a great article on transit through “What happens to public opinion when LRT is explained”. It is a great piece, which is quite informative. Take some time to read the article. Cherise Burda takes to time to explain the differences between subways, light rail, GO Trains, rapid bus and right-of-way streetcar modes of transit.

Poll shows that we want subways and we are willing to pay for it


The Toronto Transit Commission's bus #1303, a ...

The Toronto Transit Commission's bus #1303, a Daimler Buses North America/Orion Bus Industries Orion 07.501 "VII" NG HEV, travels west along St. Clair Avenue East on the 102 Markham Road route in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Greater Toronto Area supports a local sales tax dedicated to public transit and other infrastructure by 74%. Just when you though the transit debate was over in Toronto, we may be in for another round. In one corner Mayor Rob Ford who wants subways without taxes and on the other side council who wants taxes but no subways. As I said before there must be some compromise, but so far egos are prevailing. Both sides want to win, at the expense of others. If we plan on creating subways, with taxes, we should first look into a Downtown Relief Line and get something to help the Yonge line. I remember a while back wondering why council never looked into sending the Sheppard line south, through the Don Valley overground and running express to downtown; connecting at possibly York Mills, Lawrence, Eglinton and then express downtown. It should be interesting to see what debate turns up in Toronto council regarding this poll. Maybe we should forget Toronto and just fund transit initiatives in Peel, York and Durham region. It should be another interesting month in the G.T.A.

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The Need for Speed in Toronto


Need For Speed: Most Wanted

Need For Speed

I am not sure why anyone would want to change the speed limit, but we should just leave things as they are and get police to enforce the current law; ensuring that  drivers respect the speed. Making the speed limits faster will simply allow those who break the law go faster. Also, if they are too slow, get off the highway. We should also get our politicians to build more roads like the 407 to ease traffic. If there are people who want to pay let them pay.

Note: I do not even think drivers know that trucks are limited to 100 KM. If you cut off a truck and they hit you, guess who walks away.

By Andy MJ.

Read more from the Toronto Sun article below.

Need for Speed in Toronto

Speed limits on Ontario’s highways are too low, according to an Oshawa-based group. Stop100.ca is calling on the provincial government to boost existing maximum limits from the current 100 km/h by as much as 30 km/h.

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Qatar Airways keen to expand in Canada


Qatar Airways Boeing 747SR

Qatar Airways keen to expand in Canada

The CEO of Qatar Airways has said he is struggling to secure more landing rights to boost services to Canada.
Akbar Al Baker said in a speech in Montreal that Canadians deserved a better airline service to the Middle East but government restrictions were hindering progress.

“Qatar is of course interested in forging even closer ties with Canada but we are struggling with being granted additional landing rights,”

Viva / YRT Strike over — Free transit for 2 months


With the over 3 month old strike finally over commuters in York region will receive almost 2 months of free transit. The move comes in response to York Region residents, who have endured a long protracted strike and no transit service. I don’t think Torontonian’s would have accepted such a long strike in the past. The strike showed that transit was not as much of an issue in York Region. The car is definitely still king throughout the region. However this is not to say that it did not adversely affect residents; who had to find alternative modes of transportation. YRT hopes to bring users back to public transit in York Region. It will be interesting to see if York Region councillors attempt to enact the same legislation, which finally made the TTC an essential service.

For more information please go to the York Region Transit website.

http://www.yrt.ca/en/

Before You Move: Where Are The Next Transit Hubs?


Toronto Light Rail NetworkHere’s an easy question: where do you live?

Now here’s a much harder one: where should you live to ensure you’re near a GTA transit hub and how will the TTC’s plans for expansion impact the value of your home?

The answer to both queries can be worth thousands of dollars because the old real estate axiom about location, location, location has a well-known addendum: being near a subway or major transit route can instantly increase what your home is worth without you having to do anything at all.

But can you tell where they’re going to build or if the place you’re looking to buy will one day find itself on a subway or major transit line? The answer is yes, if you believe government plans about where officials hope to put the new routes.

Adding transit takes years of planning and a commitment of millions of dollars and all of it has to be done well in advance. That means the powers-that-be know where they’ll be putting the new tracks and trains as much as a decade or more before a shovel actually hits the ground.

One of those locations could be along waterfront-adjacent Cherry Street, which would make the folks on Condo Row lick their collective chops at the thought of bulging resale values.

“Streetcar access is phenomenal in terms of adding to value and presence … people want to be on a streetcar line,” said David Jackson, a Toronto urban planner.

Plans for the new tracks could start as early as spring 2009, while the underground expansion of the Don Mills subway line all the way to Morningside could have homeowners on the north side of town dreaming of dollars, though there’s no official date for that project to commence.

So just how much of a bottom line difference are we talking about here?

“Easily thirty to fifty thousand dollars,” confirmed Toronto realtor Janice Mackie. “Thirty thousand dollars is a parking spot … you don’t have to purchase that.”

What’s more, given the constant rise in gas prices and the GTA’s traffic volume, the Better Way may soon be looking even better still.

And while the two mentioned above are among the more central and immediate transit expansion schemes in the works, there are dozens of others being hatched around the GTA and Ontario as well.

Toronto Transit City

Here’s where you can check out the best laid plans that are being laid out right now.

Transit City: Can tell you about planned expansions in the city of Toronto.

Transit City map: Have a peek at what a future light rapid transit system might look like.

Move Ontario 2020: See the plans for the rest of the GTA here.

Move Ontario 2020: See a map for the GTA

Waterfront Toronto: The downtown core may soon look a lot different than it currently does.

Metrolinx: Transforming transit in the GTHA

See original CityTV News video and read more | digg story