Tag Archives: Public Transit

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First lower speeds and now road tolls – What’s next?


First lower speeds and now road tolls – What’s next?

Charging non-Torontonians a toll to drive on the Don Valley Parkway and Gardiner Expressway is one of the ideas to be presented at a special Thursday brainstorming session of councillors.

Road tolls are “coming on the horizon,” said Councillor James Pasternak, one of the freshman members of council’s so-called “mighty middle,” whose votes can determine council priorities. “Non-residents would contribute to help support the city’s prosperity.”

Conversion the Scarborough RT to an LRT Not a Dead Issue according to reports


The possibility of converting the Scarborough RT to true LRT when its current fleet reaches the end of its life, instead of conversion to ICTS Mark-II, is still being considered by the TTC.

In the supplementary agendafor the October 23 TTC meeting, the status update on Transit City includes a section on the planned upgrading and extensions of the Scarborough RT. The following paragraph appears in the document:

The project team is currently re-visiting the option of converting the Scarborough RT from its current vehicle technology to light rail technology, when the current fleet of vehicles reaches the end of its service life.

Read more at the Toronto LRT Information Site

Website: http://lrt.daxack.ca/

Mayor David Miller calls on federal leaders to ante


They cannot ignore us anymore! Toronto can have something to say in this election. However, will we even bother to show up at the polls? This remains to be seen!

Quotes from the Mayor….“We need those permanent investments in infrastructure, we need investments in public transit, we need investments in housing, culture, the environment. And that’s about our country, it’s not just about Toronto,” he said. “I think it shouldn’t be a partisan issue. I think every single party should support the future of Canada…”

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Eglinton subway not in cards – David Miller


But only paperwork in the way of Spadina extension, Mayor says
By: Natalie Alcoba
National Post Published: Saturday, July 26, 2008

Government officials signalled yesterday that construction will soon start on the anticipated Spadina subway extension, even as the Mayor dismissed a new push to build a subway along Eglinton Avenue. “You should build subways in extremely dense neighbourhoods where you have two-way traffic because there are offices and people living … you don’t build subways where there’s not that ridership and it’s not projected to be” along Eglinton, Mayor David Miller said yesterday. “And there isn’t the money, it’s that simple.”

Toronto’s ambitious Transit City project, which is planning for new light rail lines across the city, includes a light rail route along Eglinton that would extend from the airport to Kennedy, and run underground in a a 10-kilometre tunnel between Laird Drive and Keele Street.

But area city councillors and Metrolinx, the province’s GTA transportation agency, believe Eglinton may in fact warrant a subway. Metrolinx chairman Rob MacIsaac said the agency has not settled on the subway as the best route, but preliminary ridership results suggest it could use something more than a Light Rail Transit. The LRT is projected to cost $2.24-billion, which Mr. Miller says is about $4-billion less than the cost of a subway.

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Weekend Lakeshore West GO Train service extended starting October 28


Starting Sunday, October 28 weekend train trips will now start and end at Aldershot GO Station, rather than Oakville GO Station. The extension offers new weekend service for Bronte and Appleby passengers. This is a big improvement and gain for G.T.A residents. On weekends one can now take trips from Oshawa to Burlington. Hopefully, this is permanent and at some point maybe all-day service to Hamilton will begin. We can only hope that further improvements start to appear on other GO transit lines around the Greater Toronto Area.


For more information, on the changes, go to the GO Transit website.

Control of TTC deserves study


Transit advocates at Toronto City Hall passionately oppose any suggestion that Queen’s Park might snatch the TTC from municipal hands and put it under a region-wide transportation authority.

“I would fight that tooth and nail,” Mayor David Miller said in a recent interview. “It would be worse than stupid,” declared Councillor Glenn De Baeremaeker, a member of the Toronto Transit Commission’s governing board. “It reminds us of Mike Harris, who forced the megacity onto Toronto,” said commission chair Adam Giambrone.

From their standpoint, the city would be correct in resisting a transfer of the TTC to the Greater Toronto Transportation Authority, an agency set up last year to co-ordinate commuter services from Hamilton in the west, to York Region in the north and to Durham Region in the east, and everywhere in between.

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Google Transit now public


Google Transit has moved out of Google Labs and officially into Google Maps. It makes public transit directions an option, including cost and time, as well the cost differential versus driving for some areas. If you extrapolate from Google Transit, at some point in the future Google will teleport you…

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Highways vs. transit, suburban vs. urban


Highways have always been a priority in the transportation budget. Even as Mike Harris was dropping responsibility for transit in the laps of cities in the early 2000s, he was pouring cash into highways.

At the same time as the province was crying poor to transit initiatives in its largest city, $3 billion went into building highways. However, even at this rate and regularity of maintenance and construction, the GTA’s highways can’t keep up with the demand of the driving public.

What is being done for highways? The recent implementation of high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on highways 403 and 404 aims to reduce the number of cars on the road. GO Transit bus right-of-way lanes and park-and-ride stations are also relieving single-occupant cars from cluttering these routes, with a full bus potentially removing up to 57 cars from daily traffic. Given these examples of highway improvements, it seems that the solution for daily gridlock is really an increased partnership with transit.

It’s not only bumper-to-bumper traffic that damages the quality of life of Torontonians. The environmental cost of highways also needs to be taken into account. Each hour, 7,000 vehicles hit the 403 — and with growing awareness of the cost of greenhouse gases and pollution, mass transit becomes even more essential.

read more | digg story