Tag Archives: Statistics Canada

Jobless rate at record 107,000 – Spinning the numbers


Statistics Canada has surprised economists and tossed a wild card into the federal election campaign, reporting that the Canadian economy generated a record 107,000 new jobs in September. However, almost all of the new jobs – 97,000 – were part-time. Listening to 680 News, you would think that all is fine. YOU DO THE MATH! Will be interesting to see how the politicians spin this one.

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Statscan Censorship?


An interesting post on The Progressive Economics Forum

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Censorship in Canada

Censorship in Canada

Once again, there seems to be a heavier hand in editing Statistics Canada’s releases.  This morning The Daily reported that:

“Spending on research and development in the higher education sector amounted to $9.6 billion (current dollars) in the fiscal year 2006/2007.”

but there was no word on whether this was an increase or decrease from the previous period, which Statscan releases almost always have.

The year 2006/7 was the first year that the Harper government was in office.  Investment in research and development is essential to increase our economy’s productivity, which hasn’t increased since the start of 2006 (and has grown at a dismal rate since 2000).

Canada has some of the most generous tax incentives for private R&D in the world, yet Canada has one of the lowest rates of investment in R&D among OECD countries thanks to both low rates of government and business investment in R&D, accoridng to Industry Canada’s Science and Technology Data tables.  Canada’s investment in higher education R&D had recently been relatively good, but it looks like the current federal government may soon rectify that.

The Harper government is laying off federal scientists and forcing departments to slash their R&D budgets .  It is deregulating food safety inspection and transferring or selling off federal labs to the private sector, intent on further commercialization and privatization. They eliminated the national science advisor and have instead appointed Preston Manning among others to help advise on science issues.  This approach to science recently earned the Harper government scathing criticism in an editorial in Nature, one of the most respected science publications in the world.

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Immigrants choose to settle in Canada’s largest cities


Immigrants are still choosing to start their lives in Canada in one of the “big three” -Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver – but there are signs of changing times.

Among all the census metropolitan areas, Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver again attracted most of Canada’s new immigrants, according to 2006 census data on immigration released Tuesday by Statistics Canada.

Of the 1.1 million immigrants who landed in Canada between 2001 and 2006, about 70 per cent settled in one of the “big three” and about 28 per cent headed for other urban areas. Only three per cent chose to settle in a rural area, the 2006 census found.

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