Tag Archives: Senator

Powell Endorsement of Obama


In one of the most important symbolic moments of the general election, former Secretary of State Colin Powell announced today that he is endorsing Barack Obama for president. Making his decision public on NBC News’ “Meet the Press,” the long-time fixture in Republican administrations effectively reinforced the sense of momentum Obama has been building, declaring the Senator from Illinois as a “transformational figure.” “I think that Senator Obama brings a fresh set of eyes, a fresh set of ideas to the table,” said Powell. “I think we need a generational change, and I think Senator Obama has captured the feelings of the young people of America, and is reaching out in a more diverse, inclusive way across our society.”

“I think that’s inappropriate. I understand what politics is about — I know how you can go after one another, and that’s good. But I think this goes too far, and I think it has made the McCain campaign look a little narrow. It’s not what the American people are looking for,” he said.

Powell, a retired U.S. general and a Republican, was once seen as a possible presidential candidate himself.

Powell said he has some concerns about the direction of the Republican Party, adding that it has “moved more to the right than I would like to see it.”

Republicans – McCain campaign launches new low-blow attacks in hopes of deflecting attention from America’s Economic problems


Palin smears Obama an old discredited attack

The Republican vice presidential nominee told supporters in the city of Englewood that Obama “is someone who sees America, it seems, as being so imperfect that he’s palling around with terrorists who would target their own country”.

The Alaska Governor was referring to William Ayers, a member of the radical 1960s group the Weathermen who placed bombs at the Pentagon and the Capitol, who supported Obama’s first run for public office in 1995.

The Obama campaign described Palin’s guilt-by-association attack as “desperate and false”.

Republicans have promised to ramp up the rhetoric ahead of the November 4 election in a bid to arrest Senator McCain‘s recent dip in the polls following his role in delays to the $700bn economic bail-out.

On Friday, his top adviser Greg Strimple promised a “very aggressive last 30 days” of campaigning.

“We are looking forward to turning a page on this financial crisis and getting back to discussing Mr Obama’s aggressively liberal record and how he will be too risky for Americans,” he told reporters.

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Seeing that Obama was a child at the time of the existence of the Weatherman, and for the “sake” of education, see below some information on who they were. No we are NOT talking about the Taliban, which I am sure Palin would love to link him to. BTW – Who is running for president McCain or Palin? What if we said “John McCain is a terrorist”, he name is similar to Timothy McVeigh (OKC bomber). Let’s round up all those people that look like McCain and McVeigh and send them to Gitmo Bay. Do you see how ignorant you can be? This comment is directed at the core Republican base which believe the innuendo (not all). The hope to attract new voters? I don’t know if it will work. I would hope that the voters would be more thoughtful. I am certain Palin never heard of Ayers before being provided the talking point of the day since she doesn’t read newspapers. There is another high-ranking republican that doesn’t read much. It is obvious that the McCain campaign is desperate and will do or say anything to take away attention from the fact that they do not have any plans to get Americans out of the mess their party has created. Americans want to know who plans to help them stay in or get a home, put food on the table, save their jobs and stop the warmongering.

The Weathermen: Background and formation

The group emerged from the campus-based opposition to the Vietnam War, as well as the Civil Rights Movements of the late 1960s. During this time, United States military action in Southeast Asia, especially in Vietnam, escalated. In the U.S., the anti-war sentiment was particularly pronounced during the 1968 U.S. presidential election.

The origins of the Weathermen can be traced to the collapse and fragmentation of the Students for a Democratic Society. We petitioned, we demonstrated, we sat in!

Sen. Edward Kennedy has a brain tumor


BOSTON – Sen. Edward M. Kennedy has a malignant brain tumor. Doctors for the Massachusetts Democrat say tests conducted after Kennedy suffered a seizure this weekend show a tumor in his left parietal lobe. Preliminary results from a biopsy of the brain identified the cause of the seizure as a malignant glioma, they said. Some experts gave the liberal lion less than a year to live.
Edward "Ted" Kennedy

Doctors discovered the tumor after the 76-year-old senator and sole surviving son of America’s most storied political family suffered a seizure over the weekend. The diagnosis cast a pall over Capitol Hill, where the Massachusetts Democrat has served since 1962, and came as a shock to a family all too accustomed to sudden, calamitous news.

“Ted Kennedy and the Kennedy family have faced adversity more times in more instances with more courage and more determination and more grace than most families have to,” said Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass. “Every one of us knows what a big heart this fellow has. He’s helped millions and millions of people — from the biggest of legislation on the floor to the most personal.”

Kerry added: “This guy is one unbelievable fighter.”

Kennedy’s doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital said he had a malignant glioma in the left parietal lobe, a region of the brain that helps govern sensation, movement and language.

Seizures can be caused by a wide variety of things, some of them relatively minor. The finding of a brain tumor — and specifically a glioma, an especially lethal type — was about the worst possible news.

Kennedy’s doctors said he will remain in the hospital for the next couple of days as they consider chemotherapy and radiation. They did not mention surgery, a possible indication the tumor is inoperable.

Outside experts gave him no more than three years — and perhaps far less.

“As a general rule, at 76, without the ability to do a surgical resection, as kind of a ballpark figure you’re probably looking at a survival of less than a year,” said Dr. Keith Black, chairman of neurosurgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

In a statement, Dr. Lee Schwamm, vice chairman of neurology at Massachusetts General, and Dr. Larry Ronan, Kennedy’s primary physician, said the senator “has had no further seizures, remains in good overall condition, and is up and walking around the hospital.”

“He remains in good spirits and full of energy,” the physicians said.

An Associated Press photographer who was given access to the senator on Tuesday captured Kennedy, dressed in a gray sweater and dark slacks, joking and laughing with family members as he sat at a table in a family room at the hospital.

Kennedy’s wife since 1992, Vicki, and his five children and stepchildren have been at his bedside.

“Obviously it’s tough news for any son to hear,” said Robin Costello, a spokeswoman for one of Kennedy’s sons, Rep. Patrick Kennedy, D-R.I. “He’s comforted by the fact that his dad is such a fighter, and if anyone can get through something as challenging as this, it would be his father.”

Kennedy, the Senate’s second-longest serving member, was re-elected in 2006 and is not up for election again until 2012. Were he to resign or die in office, state law requires a special election for the seat 145 to 160 days afterward.

Among the potential Democratic candidates: Martha Coakley, the state’s attorney general; Rep. Edward J. Markey; former Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy II, Kennedy’s nephew; and Kennedy’s wife. The Republican contenders could include former Gov. Mitt Romney or former Lt. Gov. Kerry Healey.

Kennedy has left his stamp on a raft of health care, pension and immigration legislation during four decades in the Senate.

Senators of both parties heard about Kennedy’s condition during their weekly, closed-door policy lunches, and some looked drawn or misty-eyed.

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