Tag Archives: Flash

How Apple is killing Adobe Flash and remaking the web in Steve Jobs image


Steve Jobs while presenting the iPad in San Fr...

Steve Jobs while presenting the iPad in San Francisco 27th January 2010 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Apple’s iPad could make it the king of old media, arbiter of taste and technology alike. So magazines and newspapers have begun a series of countermoves that could turn the quietest dogfight in media into the most vicious.

In one sense, the iPad‘s January unveiling was a nerd climax, a landmark for obsessive gadget freaks. But in another it was one in a series of Apple chess movies that will determine how much influence the company wields over the future of magazines and newspapers. If the tablet device and Apple’s associated online shops become popular enough, the company could have a chokehold over publishing technology and content itself. It could become as central to the future of print media as it has become to the future of music, where Apple’s iTunes Store dominates online sales. And it could use that position to promote its preferred technologies over those of rivals, most notably Adobe’s Flash animation software, now ubiquitous on websites.

But Apple is but one player in this game; old media are making moves of their own. Apple’s refusal to work with Adobe, whose software is central to most art departments, makes publishers uneasy.

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Five reasons Chrome will take over the world!


After all the polished promises of a streamlined new way to tame the web, the blogosphere was ready to predict Chrome would inspire everything from the end of Firefox to the demise of Microsoft itself.

silicon.com spoke to industry experts and Google’s new rivals to find out why Chrome matters and whether the browser reality can deliver on the hype.

Bye bye Microsoft
Chrome carries shades of an OS in a browser’s clothing and Google’s latest encroachment on Redmond’s turf must have a few Microsoft execs sweating.

The way Chrome will allow users to run and manage applications without an OS’ intervention could mean the beginning of the end for the days of Vista’s bloatware.

David Mitchell, VP for IT research at analysts Ovum, said: “What you are seeing is the language of the browser coming very close to that of the operating system, with services provided at the browser level rather than the OS level.

“If some of the OS functionality is within the browser then there will be a demand for a more anorexic OS running underneath.

“It is a big step towards telling people like Microsoft that they are not so popular after all.”

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New 2008 Mandriva Flash 4GB released


A new, Mandriva Linux 2008-based version of the Mandriva Flash bootable USB key was released. Flash boots a complete Mandriva desktop on almost any PC, letting you take your desktop with your own data anywhere. The new version can also run Windows versions of Firefox and Thunderbird, with your bookmarks and email, when plugged into a Windows PC.

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An in-depth look at Puppy Linux


Puppy, with a download as skimpy as 28MB, is well suited to older computers, thin workstations, and diskless PCs. This article looks at the value of Puppy Linux on normal PCs, and reviews its features, flexibility, capability to peacefully coexist with Windows, ease of use, and limitations.

With hundreds of Linux distributions available, how do you determine which one is right for you?

Start by listing your needs. What will you use it for? Which features are important? How would you prioritize them? Which features don’t you care about?

Once you’ve developed your “user profile,” measure it against the strengths of different Linux distributions. Linux is configurable and gives you the full control you expect from open source software — so theoretically you could probably tailor (or strong-arm) almost any Linux distro into meeting your needs. But with hundreds of distributions to choose from, it makes more sense to select the most suitable Linux distro for your requirements.

Puppy Linux is one of the twenty most popular Linuxes worldwide, according to the distro-tracking website Distrowatch. Puppy’s distinct personality makes it of interest to those who want a Linux that…

* Includes all the applications required for daily use
* Works right out of the box
* Is easy to use, even for Linux newbies and Windows refugees
* Runs fast and performs well — especially on limited hardware
* Runs on old computers, thin clients, and diskless workstations
* Installs and boots from any bootable device, including USB memory sticks, hard disks, Zip drives, LS 120/240 SuperDisks, CDs and DVDs, rewritable CDs and DVDs, and network interfaces

Unlike most Linux distributions, Puppy is not based on some other distro. It was created from scratch to meet these goals.

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Adobe plots its path on the Web


Adobe makes the bulk of its money from packaged software in its Creative Suite, which includes Photoshop, Illustrator and other creative design tools. As it looks ahead, Adobe is trying to diversify into online services for consumers and businesses. And it would like to keep its audience of Web developers and designers loyal and not lose them to Microsoft, which is increasingly competing with Adobe.

That’s where Adobe’s Platform group comes in. It designs the plumbing that will allow Adobe product groups to offer online services and other companies to write cutting-edge applications.

For Web developers, it has made more sophisticated tooling with Flex. More significant is the Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR), cross-platform software that enables Web applications to run on a desktop.

During the company’s Max 2007 conference, Lynch, who came to Adobe through its acquisition of Macromedia in 2005, spoke to CNET News.com about Adobe’s strategy and its big bet on the Web.

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