Monthly Archives: September 2008

Magnetic Air Car Could Be Ready by 2010


Last week, I took a trip down to San Jose for West Coast Green, an environmentally-focused conference with an emphasis on sustainable building. One booth stood out from the crowd
—Magnetic Air Cars, Inc.. The San Jose-based company claims that it is working on the world’s first fuel-less car.

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Key facts for consumers about the Do Not Call list


The National Do Not Call List (DNCL) is designed to reduce the number of unwanted telemarketing calls and faxes Canadians receive.

1. How to register?

  • You can register your home phone, cellular or fax number(s) on the National DNCL.
  • Signing up is simple, quick and free. You can sign up online at www.LNNTE-DNCL.gc.ca or by calling the toll-free numbers 1-866-580-DNCL (1-866-580-3625) or 1-888-DNCL-TTY (1-888-362-5889).
  • Once you have signed up, many telemarketers can no longer call you starting 31 days after your registration.
  • You must renew your registration every three years if you want your number(s) to stay on the National DNCL.

2. Who can still call you?

  • Registering on the National DNCL will reduce but not eliminate all telemarketing calls and faxes.
  • There are certain kinds of telemarketing calls and faxes that are exempt from the National DNCL, including those made by or on behalf of:
  • registered charities seeking donations
  • newspapers looking for subscriptions
  • political parties and their candidates, and
  • companies with whom you have an existing commercial relationship; for example, if you have done business with a company in the previous 18 months––such as a carpet-cleaning company––that company can call you.
  • Telemarketers making exempt calls must maintain their own do not call lists. If you do not want to be called by these telemarketers, you can ask to be put on their do not call lists. They are obliged to do so within 31 days.
  • For more information, see Part II of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules and the Telecommunications Act.

3. Market research, polls and surveys

  • You will continue to receive calls from organizations conducting market research, polls or surveys even though you are registered on the National DNCL. These are not considered telemarketing calls because they are not selling a product or service, or requesting donations.

4. Rules telemarketers must follow when they call

  • Among other things, telemarketers must:
  • identify who they are and, upon request, provide you with a fax or telephone number where you can speak to someone about the telemarketing call
  • display the telephone number that they are calling from or that you can call to reach them, and
  • only call or send faxes between 9:00 a.m. and 9:30 p.m. on weekdays and between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. on weekends.
  • Telemarketers must not use Automatic Dialing and Announcing Device (devices that dial telephone numbers automatically and deliver a pre-recorded message). However, these devices can be used by police and fire departments, schools and hospitals, as well as for appointment reminders and thank you calls.
  • For more information, see Part III and Part IV of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules.

5. Complaints

  • Complaints about telemarketers can be made through the National DNCL website (www.LNNTE-DNCL.gc.ca) or by calling the toll-free numbers 1-866-580-DNCL (1-866-580-3625) or 1-888-DNCL-TTY (1-888-362-5889).
  • Types of complaints can include receiving a call even though you have registered on the National DNCL, receiving a call outside of permitted calling hours, a telemarketer who does not put your name and number on their do not call list, or any other violation of the rules.
  • When making a complaint, remember that you must provide information such as the date of the call and the name or telephone number of the telemarketer.
  • The CRTC will investigate complaints and can penalize telemarketers found to be in violation of any of the CRTC’s Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules.
  • The CRTC can levy penalties of up to $1,500 for an individual and up to $15,000 for a corporation, for each violation.

http://www.crtc.gc.ca/ENG/INFO_SHT/t1031.htm

The bailout has failed


The lower house of the US Congress has voted down a $700bn (£380bn) plan aimed at bailing out Wall Street.
The rescue plan, a result of tense talks between the government and lawmakers, was rejected by 228 to 205 votes in the House of Representatives.

About two-thirds of Republican lawmakers refused to back the rescue package, as well as 95 Democrats. Shares on Wall Street plunged within seconds of the announcement, after earlier falls on global markets. A White House spokesman said that President George W Bush was “very disappointed” by the result.
He would meet members of his team in the coming days to “determine next steps”, spokesman Tony Fratto said. The vote followed a day of turmoil in the financial sector. Wachovia, the fourth-largest US bank, was bought by larger rival Citigroup in a rescue deal backed by US authorities.

Benelux banking giant Fortis was partially nationalised by the Dutch, Belgian and Luxembourg governments to ensure its survival. The UK government announced it was nationalising the Bradford & Bingley bank. Global shares fell sharply – France’s key index lost 5%, Germany’s main market dropped 4% while US shares also lost ground.

So grave are the consequences of this decision, reports the BBC’s Kevin Connolly from Washington, that the speaker of the house paused for several long minutes after the vote was taken before declaring it official.
The no vote plunged the world of Washington politics into turmoil and the markets into deep and instant chaos with rapid falls on Wall Street, our correspondent says. Mr Bush had argued that the bail-out plan was a “bold” one which he was confident would restore strength and confidence to the US economy.

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Do-Not-Call List Launches Tomorrow


There is considerable media attention today on tomorrow’s launch of the National Do-Not-Call List. Starting tomorrow, Canadians will be able to register up to three phone numbers on the DNCL. Organizations will have 31 days to abide by the request. Failure to do so can result in penalties of up to $15,000. Bell Canada is running the list.

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McCain attempts to bail out Palin


WASHINGTON (CNN)— Sen. John McCain retracted Sarah Palin’s stance on Pakistan Sunday morning, after the Alaska governor appeared to back Sen. Barack Obama’s support for unilateral strikes inside Pakistan against terrorists

“She would not…she understands and has stated repeatedly that we’re not going to do anything except in America’s national security interest,” McCain told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos of Palin. “In all due respect, people going around and… sticking a microphone while conversations are being held, and then all of a sudden that’s—that’s a person’s position… This is a free country, but I don’t think most Americans think that that’s a definitve policy statement made by Governor Palin.”

Saturday night, while on a stop for cheesesteaks in South Philadelphia, Palin was questioned by a Temple graduate student about whether the U.S. should cross the border from Afghanistan into Pakistan.

“If that’s what we have to do stop the terrorists from coming any further in, absolutely, we should,” Palin said.

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McCain Runs Web Ads Claiming to Win Debate – Before Debate!


Although the fate of tonight’s presidential debate in Mississippi remains very much up in the air, John McCain has apparently already won it — if you believe a web ad in the online edition of the Wall Street Journal this morning.

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How the Washington Mutual Takeover Will Affect Consumers


The government seized banking giant Washington Mutual last night and then sold some pieces of it to JPMorgan Chase for approximately $1.9 billion.

The failure of the Seattle-based bank Washington Mutual undermined confidence in a fresh clutch of US household names today, as investors digested the implications of the biggest collapse of a high-street bank on record.

Washington Mutual, which was bought by JP Morgan after being seized by the US authorities late yesterday, had a stockpile of controversial “option ARM” mortgages which allow borrowers multiple options in setting the level of their own repayments.

These flexible loans, which were popular at the height of the housing boom, have proven to be huge liabilities for banks, and other firms known to hold them saw their stock prices plummet today.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/sep/26/banking.creditcrunch1

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Sandwich recall not linked to Maple Leaf Foods – Listeria


By The Canadian Press

TORONTO – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says the recall of 16 varieties of sandwiches sparked by Listeria worries isn’t linked to Maple Leaf Foods.

The CFIA announced the recall of 16 types of Hygaard brand sandwiches that could be contaminated with the bacteria, though no illnesses have been reported.

CFIA spokesman Garfield Balsom says Alberta-based Hygaard Fine Foods notified the agency on Wednesday that environmental testing had detected Listeria.

The company issued the voluntary recall of the products, which have best-before dates ranging from Oct. 24 up to and including Nov. 16.

The products have been distributed across Canada except for Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick and are sold in retail outlets and vending machines.

Listeria can cause the disease listeriosis, which can cause fever, headache, nausea and neck stiffness.

Elderly people and pregnant women, as well as people who have weakened immune systems, are particularly vulnerable.

A countrywide outbreak of listeriosis that has been linked to a massive Maple Leaf Foods recall has claimed the lives of 18 people.

Here is a list of recalled products, including product name, size and UPC. All best-before dates are from Oct. 24 up to and including Nov. 16.

-Super Donair, 251 grams, 0 65504 49522 6

-Mini Pizza Sub, 140 grams, 0 65504 49440 3

-Little John Sub, 387 grams, 0 65504 49446 5

-Hoagie, 238 grams, 0 65504 49424 3

-Mini Hoagie family pack, 822 grams, 0 65504 49764 0, 0 65504 49765 7

-Mini Pizza Sub, 156 grams, 0 65504 49466 3

-Mini Pizza sub family pack, 798 grams, 0 65504 49760 2, 0 65504 49623 0, 0 65504 49762 6

-Super Pizza Sub, 380 grams, 0 65504 49517 2

-Lumberjack Sub, 312 grams, 0 65504 49413 7

-Mini Sub, 133 grams, 0 65504 49430 4

-Salt and Pepper Dry Ribs, 164 grams, 0 65504 49455 8

-Super Sub, 165 grams, 0 65504 49458 8

-Mini Ham Sub Family Pack, 738 grams, 0 65504 49759 6, 0 65504 49763 3, 0 65504 49624 7

-Philly Steak Sub, 219 grams, 0 65504 49497 7

-Spicy Donair, 155 grams, 0 65504 49467 0

-Sausage and Egg Muffin, 165 grams, 0 65504 49418 2

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Undemocratic Canada? Parties excluded and FPNP Challange the Democratic Process


Response letter to CTV New cast Sept 11th, 2008 Re: “Fringe parties excluded”

Canada

Canada

Dr. David Suzuki spoke on Canada AM Thrusday morning September 11th, to promote his new book on the enviroment. He was asked about the Green party leader, Elizabeth May, and her participating in the leader’s debate. To paraphrase Mr. Suzuki he stated that GREEN values should be integral in all political parties, and because it is not, we need the Green Party. With the Green Party included in the debates the environment will definitely be an issue during the leaders’s debate.

The First Peoples National Party (FPNP), Canada’s newest offical and federal party is also excluded from the debate. The FPNP ran 5 candidates in the last election with more votes collectly then most of the other small parties. When these small official federal parties are labled “Fringe” parties by the media and excluded from the debate where is the democracy?

Canada’s First Peoples are the only ethnic group governed separately then the rest of the Canadians and under the responsibility of the federal government. Therefore, the First Peoples are Canada’s unifying element. The Bloc Quebecois on the other hand are a non-federalist political party with a goal to separate from Canada. They will be included in this debate.

Canada’s First Peoples are not part of the political system and is the reason why the First Peoples National Party (FPNP) was formed. Any country that excludes its indigenous peoples from its political system is a colonial society.

Inspired and formed by Canada’s First Peoples the FPNP is the only party that can be truly called a National Federal Party yet we are left out of this national debate. The First Peoples values of inclusion is the reason why Canada exists today. It is this value of inclusion that guides the FPNP and our policies.

Just as Mr. Suzuki suggested of the Green Party, the FPNP has the MORAL RIGHT to be included in the national leader’s debate. Only then would the centuries old injustices be addressed and healing for all Canadians can begin.

The First Peoples National Party is putting people first, giving voice to all people. No other federal party can say that. Until those voices are heard by all Canadians we don’t live in a democracy.

Will Morin
Eastern Director FPNP
Offical FPNP Candidate, Sudbury, Ontario
1-705-561-8004, toll free: 1-877-248-4133
email: willpower@ontera.net
http://www.fpnpoc.ca

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Intolerant Faith Obama Effigy hung at George Fox University


A cardboard cutout of Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama was hung from a tree in effigy at the George Fox University outside Portland Oregon. This college, founded by Quakers, claims to promote diversity(including forcing all faculty and staff to sign a statement professing faith in Christian doctrine) to reflect the character of God…

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A list of all Canadian Political parties this election


Well in case you “really” need to know, some details on the parties asking for your votes in this upcoming election are below.

——–

Animal Alliance
The Animal Alliance Environment Voters Party of Canada was founded in 2005 and the current leader is Liz White. Their headquarters are in Toronto Ontario and currently hold no seats, nor historically have they ever won a seat in the House of Commons. “Animal Alliance of Canada is committed to the protection of all animals and the promotion of a harmonious relationship among people, animals and the environment.” View their official website at – www.animalalliance.ca


Bloc Quebecois

The Bloc Quebecois are a centre-left party that is devoted to the goal of sovereignty for Quebec. It only runs candidates in Quebec and does currently have seats in Parliament. Founded in 1991 the current party leader is Gilles Duceppe. The party headquarters are in Montreal Quebec. Visit their official website at www.blocquebecois.org


Canadian Action Party

Former federal defence minister Paul Hellyer founded the Canadian Action Party in 1997. The current party leader is Connie Fogal, and they have their headquarters in Vancouver British Columbia. CAP currently does not have any members of Parliament, nor have they had any elected in the past. The Canadian Action Party is a nationalist party and their website can be found at www.canadianactionparty.ca


Christian Heritage Party

Looking for Canada to be governed according to biblical teachings, the Christian Heritage Party of Canada was founded in 1987. The current leader of the party is Ron Gray, and the headquarters for the party is located in Ottawa Ontario. The CHP has not won any seats in Parliament in its history. Visit the CHP website at www.chp.ca

Communist Party of Canada

Even though the Communist Party of Canada has no seats in the federal Parliament, it has been able to influence through the courts Canada’s electoral laws, making them more democratic and inclusive. The Communist Party of Canada’s leader is Miguel Figueroa, and the party was founded in May 1921. Party headquarters are in Toronto Ontario and the official website can be found at www.communist-party.ca


Marxist-Leninist Party of Canada

Marxist-Leninist Party of Canada as it is known for official election purposes, prefers the party be called CPC-ML – Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist). Founded in 1970, the party has no seats in the Canadian House of Commons and is headquartered in Montreal Quebec. Visit the official site at www.mlpc.ca


Conservative Party of Canada

The Conservative Party of Canada is a creation of the merger of both the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. The merger of the parties took place in December 2003 after the Conservative Party Agreement-in-Principle between the current Prime Minister Stephen Harper (then leader of the CA), and Peter MacKay (then leader of the Progressive Conservative Party). The party currently forms the government of Canada in a minority position. Party headquarters are in Ottawa Ontario, and the party’s official website is www.conservative.ca


First Peoples National Party

Advancing the issues of the Aboriginal peoples in Canada, the First Peoples National Party of Canada, or FPNPC, was founded in 2005. The party nominates candidates in ridings with large Aboriginal populations, but have yet to win a seat in the House of Commons. The party headquarters are in Sault Ste. Marie Ontario. Visit the official website at www.fpnpoc.ca


Green Party of Canada

The largest of the federally registered political parties without seats in the House of Commons, the Green Party of Canada was founded in 1983 around a green platform. The current party leader is Elizabeth May, and the party headquarters are in Ottawa Ontario. The Greens ran candidates in every riding in the last two federal elections. The official site for the Green Party can be found at www.greenparty.ca


Liberal Party of Canada

Canada’s oldest continuously running federal political party is the Liberal Party of Canada. Founded July 1, 1867, the Liberal Party has often been the party to lead Canada. This centre-left party has its headquarters in Ottawa Ontario, and is currently the Official Opposition in the Canadian Parliament. Current party leader is Stephane Dion, and the official website can be found at www.liberal.ca


Libertarian Party

The Libertarian Party of Canada was founded in 1975 and is headquartered in Embrun Ontario. Adhering to libertarian tenets the party has yet to win any seats in the House of Commons. The party leader is Jean-Serge Brisson and the official website is www.libertarian.ca


Marijuana Party

With a goal to end the prohibition of cannabis, Marc-Boris St-Maurice founded the Marijuana Party of Canada in 2000. The current party leader is Blair T. Longley, and the party headquarters are in Osoyoos British Columbia. The Marijuana Party does not have seats in the House of Commons but has been instrumental in changing Canada’s electoral laws. The party website is www.marijuanaparty.com


The New Democratic Party

The New Democratic Party, which was founded on June 17, 1961, currently holds seats in the House of Commons and forms the governments of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The federal NDP are a centre-left party lead by Jack Layton, and the party headquarters are in Ottawa Ontario. Visit the federal NDP website at www.ndp.ca


Progressive Canadian Party

Members of the former Progressive Conservative Party of Canada who opposed the party merger with the Canadian Alliance founded the Progressive Canadian Party in March 2004. The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, or PC Party, currently has no seats in Parliament and is lead by Sinclair Stevens. The party headquarters are in Toronto Ontario. The PC Party official website is www.progressivecanadian.org

Wikipedia’s definition of a Carbon Tax


carbon tax is an environmental tax on emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. It is an example of a pollution tax.

Carbon atoms are present in every fossil fuel (coal, oil and gas) and are released as CO2 when they are burnt. In contrast, non-combustion energy sources — wind, sunlight, hydropower, and nuclear — do not convert hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide. Accordingly, a carbon tax is effectively a tax on the use of fossil fuels, and only fossil fuels. Some schemes also include other greenhouse gases; the global warming potential is an internationally accepted scale of equivalence for other greenhouse gases in units of tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent.

Because of the link with global warming, a carbon tax is sometimes assumed to require an internationally administered scheme. However, that is not intrinsic to the principle. The European Union considered a carbon tax covering its member states prior to starting its emissions trading scheme in 2005. The UK has unilaterally introduced a range of carbon taxesand levies to accompany the EU ETS trading regime. Note that emissions trading systems do not constitute a Pigovian tax because it entails the creation of a property right. Nonetheless, both taxes and tradable permits put a price on emissions, and that price is equal to all parties involved. Therefore, emission reduction targets are met at minimum cost.

The intention of a carbon tax is environmental: to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and thereby slow climate change. It can be implemented by taxing the burning of fossil fuels — coal, petroleum products such as gasoline and aviation fuel, and natural gas — in proportion to their carbon content. Unlike other approaches such as carbon cap-and-trade systems, direct taxation has the benefit of being easily understood and can be popular with the public if the revenue from the tax is returned by reducing other taxes. Alternatively, it may be used to fund environmental projects.

In economic theory, pollution is considered a negative externality because it has a negative effect on a party not directly involved in a transaction.

To confront parties with the issue, the economist Arthur Pigou proposed taxing the goods (in this case fossil fuels) which were the source of the negative externality (carbon dioxide) so as to accurately reflect the cost of the goods’ production to society, thereby internalizing the costs associated with the goods’ production. A tax on a negative externality is termed aPigovian tax, and should equal the marginal damage costs.

A carbon tax is an indirect tax — a tax on a transaction — as opposed to a direct tax, which taxes income. As a result, some American conservatives have supported such a carbon tax because it taxes at a fixed rate, independent of income, which complements their support of a flat tax.[2]

Prices of carbon (fossil) fuels are expected to continue increasing as more countries industrialize and add to the demand on fuel supplies. In addition to creating incentives for energy conservation, a carbon tax would put renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and geothermal on a more competitive footing, stimulating their growth.

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